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  • 如何在繁忙的工作中享受片刻的清闲
  • 2014/4/14 10:58:34 来源:重庆教育人生网
  •    在日复一日的忙碌中,我们总觉得时间不够用,总想最大程度地利用起每一分每一秒,但你是不是有时很想给自己留出那么一段时间,什么也不做,什么也不想,就是静静地享受片刻清闲?那么就跟本文的作者学学吧,找出自己生活中的空当,不想肩头的责任,摆脱琐事的羁绊,在忙碌中给自己的心灵放个小假……
    When I travel, one part of the trip I really look forward to is the airport.
    By this I don’t mean the actual flight: Airlines appear to operate under the assumption that though you’ve bought a service from them, they are in no way obligated to provide that service; anything close to an on-time departure is a miracle greater than the miracle of flight itself.
    Nor do I mean the part in the air, where water and food are dispensed in the smallest possible increments (if at all), the person in front reclines his chair, intruding on what little space you’ve managed to seize for yourself, babies wail and a nearby passenger coughs wetly for three hours straight, sending plague-filled microbes into the communal air.
    I am not too fond, either, of the beginning part of the airport experience: where you’re shuffled, assembly-line style, between various squadrons of airport officials.
    The nadir of this journey to the gate is always the security check, during which you’re forced to remove far more clothing than seems necessary (sweaters, scarves, hats, belts, shoes—all come off) and stand barefoot on a disconcertingly moist floor while the security personnel—alternately bored or hostile—either glance fleetingly at the X-ray of your things and wave you away, without missing a beat of their conversation, or squint menacingly at their screen and bark at you for failing to disclose your lip gloss.
    No, the part of flying I like most is after you’ve made it through the initial checkpoints, but before you’ve been marched onto the plane and into squabbles with fellow passengers over space in the overhead compartments. The part where you’re just in the airport, waiting.
    This period can last anywhere from half an hour to multiple hours, depending on how diligently you have adhered to the airline’s recommendation about preflight arrival time and how committed the airline is to on-time departures.
    What I love about this period is that, unlike in the majority of my waking life, I feel no obligation to be in any way productive.
    My default operating mode borrows heavily from the Protestant work ethic: Virtue comes from hard work and diligence; sloth is to be avoided.
    Much as I often wish it weren’t so, I tend to equate idleness with indolence. I do, of course, laze about from time to time, but I can never feel completely at ease while doing so. Underpinning any period of relaxation is the guilty feeling that I should be making better use of my time by exercising, maybe, or vacuuming. At the very least I should be sorting mail while watching television.
    Waiting in airports provides a welcome reprieve. Even if there are activities I could be doing (catching up on e-mails, online banking), I feel absolutely no compulsion to do anything.
    Maybe it’s something in the recycled airport air, but I find waiting in airports very relaxing. To me it feels like a period of calm waiting, a pause between the chaos of daily life and the rigours of a vacation.
    The closest substitute I have ever found for the airport lounge is the hangover, during which the pain of the previous night’s excesses drives away the pretense of productivity and I can happily spend a Saturday on a friend’s couch watching TV and rehashing our escapades.
    Unfortunately (or fortunately) the other side effects of the hangover are such that it doesn’t do to make it a regular occurrence.
    Which leaves the airport.
    I like to drift through the luxury shops imagining I’m the type of person who would normally shop there, perhaps in advance of a yachting excursion.
    I go to the duty-free store and sample perfumes and talk myself out of buying a multilitre bottle of vodka. (“What a good price!” says one side of me. “Think of the hangover,” growls the other.)
    I wander around the terminal, narrowly avoiding being hit by airport golf-carts. There’s a surprising amount of art in airports if you look for it. I suss out snack options and electric outlets. I read.
    I also like to people-watch: roving bands of adolescents in school T-shirts who have escaped whatever tenuous hold their teachers had over them; businessmen, loud and red-faced from the bar; multigenerational families pushing elderly matriarchs in wheelchairs; long-haired youths in hemp pants, usually with musical instruments in tow; pasty-white couples en route to the Caribbean, already wearing flip-flops and straw hats.
    I like to sit back in my bank of 10 attached chairs and watch them float by on the moving staircase.
    No working, no studying, no worrying that I should be founding an NGO or training for a triathlon or learning some do-it-yourself plumbing (all the things that other harder-working people seem to be doing).
    Instead, I take a breath of the airport air and enjoy the pause.
    出门旅行时,整个旅途中我真正期待的部分是机场。
    我这么说并不是指我期待实际的航班:航空公司的运行仿佛基于这样的想法——就算你花钱买了他们的服务,他们也没有任何义务提供这样的服务;任何接近准点起飞的事情都是奇迹,比飞行这一奇迹本身更了不起。
    我指的也不是飞机在空中飞行的部分:在那里,乘务人员添加水和食品时给的量总是少得不能再少(即便有的话);坐在你前排的那个家伙总会把他的座椅往后仰,侵占了你好不容易为自己抢到的一小块巴掌大的地方;婴儿们嚎啕大哭;坐在附近的一位乘客连续三个小时一直在咳嗽,喷出的唾沫将病菌悉数散播到了大家共同呼吸的空气中。
    我也不太喜欢刚到机场那段时间里的经历:你就像身处流水线上一样,在一群又一群机场工作人员之间被折腾来折腾去。
    在前往登机口的过程中最令人难受的环节就是安检。安检时你要被迫脱去身上的各种衣物,数量之多似乎远远超出了必要(毛衣、围巾、帽子、腰带、鞋子——统统脱掉),然后光脚站在让人仓皇失措的潮湿地面上。而这期间安检人员——不是一脸不耐烦就是充满敌意——要么飞快地瞥一眼你的物品的X光扫描结果,然后挥手放行,一点都不耽误他们互相聊天;要么气势汹汹地眯眼盯着屏幕,然后厉声呵斥你怎么不把唇彩掏出来给他们看。
    不,以上这些都不是我期待的。关于乘飞机,我最喜欢的是下面这段时间:你已经顺利通过了刚开始的各种检查站,但还未被一路推搡着登上飞机,还没有为了抢头顶行李舱里那点空间而与同机的乘客争吵。就是你待在机场里等待的那段时间。
    这段时间少则半小时,多则数小时,取决于你是不是严格遵守航空公司关于提前到达机场的建议,也取决于航空公司在多大程度上履行准时起飞的承诺。
    我喜欢这段时间是因为与大部分清醒的时候不同,这时的我不会感觉自己有任何义务做任何富有成效的事情。
    我一贯的工作态度在很大程度上借鉴了新教徒的职业道德:努力工作、勤奋刻苦是美德;懒惰是应避免的陋习。
    我往往把无所事事与好逸恶劳划等号,尽管我常常希望自己不这么想。当然,我的确也会时不时地懒散,但即便是这种时候我也从未感到完全放松。只要放松一段时间,负罪感就会油然而生,总觉得我应该更好地利用一下这段时间,比如锻炼身体,或者打扫卫生。最起码我也应该一边看电视一边整理邮件。
    在机场等待让我暂时得到了解脱,令我心情愉悦。尽管这段时间里我也可以做很多事(比如查收电子邮件、处理网银业务),但我却完全没有做事的冲动。
    或许这是由于机场内的循环空气的缘故,但我觉得在机场等待这件事让人非常放松。对我来说,这是一段安静等待的时光,是每日的忙乱生活和即将到来的辛苦假期之间一个短暂的停歇。
    截至目前,我发现能替代在机场慵懒闲逛的最近似的体验是宿醉——此时,前一夜过量饮酒带来的痛苦让我不必再假装高效做事,我可以整个周六都幸福地蜷在朋友家的沙发上一边看电视,一边重温我们前一晚的疯狂。
    不幸的(或者幸运的)是,宿醉还有许多其他的副作用,想让它成为“家常便饭”是行不通的。
    所以就只剩下机场了。
    我喜欢穿梭在一间又一间奢侈品商店里,想象着我是那种经常在这些店里买东西的人,等会儿可能还要乘游艇出行。
    我走进免税店,试用各种香水,说服自己放弃买几升装的大瓶伏特加的念头。(“多便宜啊!”我心里的一个声音说。“想想宿醉的后果吧!”另一个声音怒气冲冲地反驳。)
    我在航站楼里闲逛,小心避开那些险些撞到我的机场高尔夫球车。机场里的艺术品数量惊人,只是你得用心去找。我探寻有什么可吃的小吃,查找哪里有电源插座。我在这里读书。
    我还喜欢观察机场里的人:穿着校服的青少年成功地摆脱了老师们本就无力的控制,成群结队地在机场里闲逛;走出酒吧的商人们高谈阔论、面红耳赤;几代同堂的一家人推着坐在轮椅上的老祖母;长头发的年轻人穿着麻布裤子,身上通常带着乐器;面色苍白的夫妻正准备前往加勒比海,已经穿上了人字拖,戴上了草帽。
    我喜欢闲坐在十个座位连在一起的长排椅子上,看人们乘着移动扶梯从我面前经过。
    不用工作。不用学习。不用发愁是不是应该成立一个非政府组织,或是参加三项全能训练,或是学一些自己动手修理水管的本事(总之其他勤奋工作的人似乎会做的所有事)。
    什么都不用做。我深吸了一口机场的空气,享受着这短暂的停歇。

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